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If a robot is moving overhead to transfer an item from one area to another, how far off the ground must it be and what is the citation? Thank you.

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I have a question about the risk estimation methodology outlined in TR15.306. In Table 1 "Injury severity, exposure, and avoidance factors" it gives the guidance: "Choose most likely." This sounds to me like even if it is somewhat possible for a higher rating to apply, if a lower rating is significantly more likely to apply we should go with that one. For example, consider the risk of a large industrial robot striking an operator. Even moving at full speed, a reversible injury is much more likely than death/dismemberment. For this, I would select S2, but I was curious about how others are interpreting this table. Another example might be the situation where an operator is validating a program using a teach pendant. In this case, as long as reduced speed is applied and the operator is using the enabling device on the pendant, I would consider giving this an S1 rating. Yes, it is hypothetically possible for the operator to be crushed (S2 or S3) between the robot and the workpiece, but it is much, much more likely that an operator will drop/squeeze the enabling device before any significant injury occurs. A counterpoint to this would be the risk of reaching into a moving drive system. This would be S3 regardless, considering that should the person actually make contact with the drive system, it might have a high likelihood of drawing in and severing their hand. If this interpretation of the table isn’t correct, I would be very interested in learning how other people address these situations.

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Hi, I am trying to build a flippable workbench in my garage for my tools. The idea it to have the tools on a platform that can rotate 180 degrees and lock to be suspended under the table. I am trying to find a servo or step motor that is powerful enough to flip a 40-50 pound powertool, but am not sure where to start looking. I have been playing around with a prototype using Arduino, but wanted advice on how to make a heavy-duty one. Thanks, Brian 818-312-1472

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Looking for a company that does research and design to create construction plans for a complete assembly line build. Please contact me. Doug 216-706-6432

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We are installing an automated ultrasonic scanning system (5-axis) that only has one function - ultrasonic scanning. The definition of robot in R15.06 Is this considered to be an industrial robot? We were told not because it doesn't have a multipurpose manipulator - it just does ultrasonic scanning. Does R15.06 apply? Gary, 310-331-7191

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Hi All. I am after ideas for a robot arm that I can control to use for remote spray painting. Application requires arm to be positioned in different locations on all axis and hence would not suit a typical fixed robot paint solution. My thinking is along the lines of a Arm that can be controlled by an operator (ideally through a arm/hand interface but joystick as minimum) and then remote camera's through some form of Heads up Display to see blind spots. Any ideas and thoughts welcomed

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When am I required to update a robotic cell to current RIA standards?

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We have a packing line with a small LR Mate that loads parts in a box. Its actual movement is minimal. It rotates about 30 deg, Picks up a part using a magnet. Raises about 12 inches and moves back 30 deg then lowers the part into the box. Its speed could be set really slow as the next part is not ready for 30 seconds. Is there a speed at which this type of setup is not considered dangerous or at least does not require full guarding. Maybe just guarding the part pick up point.

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I have a question relating to minimum gaps for non-collaborative robots. I don't see any specific provisions in R15.06 that require a minimum gap between the robot and perimeter fencing. The only real reference to minimum gaps I could find was "Minimum gaps to prevent crushing comply with ISO 13854," but there is no specific requirement that crushing be prevented though any specific means. For a example, it is not uncommon for there to be a situation where there is no minimum gap, presence sensing is prohibitively difficult or expensive, and therefore procedural controls are put in place (e.g. visually clear the cell) to prevent crushing. So, I guess my question is twofold: 1) How do other people assess the risk of crushing between robot and perimeter fencing? and 2) are there any significant requirements in R15.06 that i'm missing?

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Is there a minimum safe access opening dimension (i.e. interlocked door) for a robotic cell? This opening is used for maintenance of the robot and/or machine it is tending.

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My OTC Almega welding robot using an OTC DA300P power supply unit will feed the welding wire in manual but will not feed it in auto mode.

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What resolutions/accuracy's are available for you force sensors?

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Hello, I am proposing an overhead gantry style Cartesian robot (3 axes of travel) to depalletize 3 sections sequentially, each containing a pallet of boxes. The entire opening is supervised by a light curtain. The customer wants the ability to enter 1 of the 3 pallet areas and be able to change out an empty pallet for a full one without stopping the machine. This is an obvious "no-no" being that humans shouldn't be allowed to enter an automated cell with moving equipment. Is there any documentation that supports my case?

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We are trying to find ways to make it easier for maintenance personnel to utilize multiple enabling devices. Right now, we seem to either have the option of using detachable enabling devices (which is detected by our control system), or to use enabling devices with really long cables that can reach across the cell. The problem with the detachable option, is that the extra required step of plugging them in massively reduces how frequently they are used. The perfect solution in my mind would be wireless enabling devices. Do these exist? If not, what ways have other people solved this problem?

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Are there robots on ships?

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Please offer clarification on point 5.5.3. The definition of hazard zone is in question. We have examined the robot motion and the interaction with product and agreed that the hazard is at this interface. A DCS zone is defined as well - this is not at the position where the robot interfaces with the product but at some distance away. This allows the robot to function without hitting this soft limit. The measurement for risk analysis was made to the interface point - as we understand to be the hazard. Can you please offer clarification on the term 'hazard zone'. Further to the question for safeguarding material flow in 5.10.7. This directs us to ISO 13857 as well as Annex C. There is no recommended safe distance provided for openings larger than 120mm and reaching through an opening. Please advise.

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I am looking for integrators who do work in IML Labeling (pick and place?). Placing labels on a mold surface of a blow molding or injection molding machine.

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How can I lease or time share a collaborative robot?

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We have a few EX series robots. We replaced the encoder batteries the other day. On one of the units we get an encoder battery error message when trying to put into teach. Batteries show 3.6 volts each. What could be wrong?

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Where can I find a Stop Distance Measuring Device that will work for industrial robots?

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