October 9-11, 2018
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center
Detroit, MI
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About the Conference

Robot sales are at an all-time high and robot safety is of paramount importance in automation planning. The RIA International Robot Safety Conference will offer conference sessions and workshops that examine key issues in robot safety and provide an in-depth overview of current industry standards.

NEW TO IRSC THIS YEAR!

RIA Technical ReportsReceive a Sneak Preview of Upcoming Technical Reports

  • The ISO/TR 20218-1:2018- Safety Design for End-Effectors Technical Report
  • The RIA TR R15.706- Guidance for Users Technical Report
  • The RIA TR R15.806- Testing Methods for Power & Force Limiting Robot Systems
  • The RIA TR R15.906- Safety-Related Software Technical Report

Opening Reception! A new networking reception for all IRSC attendees will be held at 5:00pm on Tuesday, October 9. Sponsored by General Motors and FANUC America, this reception will be held at GM World in the Renaissance Center.

Extended Exhibit Hours! Exhibit hours this year will be from 12:00 PM through 7:00 PM on Wednesday, October 10, 2018, with a reception in the exhibits area from 5:00-7:00 PM.

Want to visit the exhibits but can't make it to the conference? Register for an "Exhibits Only" pass! This pass will allow you to visit the exhibits any time on Wednesday, October 10 from 2:00-7:00pm.

Closing Keynote Speaker! Martin Ciupa with MindMaze, “Managing AI and Smart Robotics Risks in Industry 4.0 Today and into the Future” on October 11, 2018

Join us for a Post-Conference Event on Friday, October 12, for a Ford Rouge Factory Tour

Questions? Contact Sofia Nordenstam at snordenstam@robotics.org.

CLICK HERE to learn more about Detroit

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Why Attend

Attending IRSC empowers you with the most current safety insight and connections to develop winning strategies and your competitive edge.

  • Benefit from what’s new in robot safety.
  • Connect with safety professionals and leaders in the automation industry.
  • Expand your knowledge and understanding of the latest trends in robot safety, new safety standards, and the new collaborative robots technical report.

CLICK HERE to learn more about Detroit

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See Who's Speaking

Who Should Attend

The 2018 RIA International Robot Safety Conference welcomes:

  • Engineers
  • Robot system integrators
  • Technicians
  • Industrial safety professionals
  • Educators
  • Environmental, Health & Safety professionals
  • And other manufacturing automation professionals.
  • Aerospace
  • Assembly
  • Automotive
  • Electronics
  • Packaging
  • Semiconductor

Gain valuable insight on robot safety and industrial machine and robot standards.

Conference sessions and workshops will focus on current ISO 10218-1, 2:2011 industrial robot safety standards as well as other ANSI and ISO standards that pertain to robots and industrial automation.

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FIRST TIME IN DETROIT?

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Agenda

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2018
8:00 AM – 8:30 AM
Welcome and Introduction
Carole Franklin, Robotic Industries Association (RIA)
Carole Franklin

Carole Franklin

Robotic Industries Association (RIA)

Welcome to the 30th Annual Robot Safety Conference! In this session we will identify the major robot safety concepts and standards documents that will be referenced throughout the next three days.

8:30 AM – 9:00 AM
Safety Professionals: What You Need to Know About Robotics & Safety
Jeff Pratt, Crown Equipment and César Reyes Núñez, Crown Mexico
Jeff PrattCésar Reyes Núñez

Jeff Pratt

Crown Equipment

César Reyes Núñez

Crown Mexico

Safety Professionals: What You Need to Know About Robotics & Safety

During this 30 minute lecture Jeff and César will discuss "Safety Professionals: What you need to know about robot safety." This is an introduction that lays the groundwork for what EHS professionals and End Users should be listening for over the next few days in this conference. We will use examples of various levels of risk that we all experience on a daily basis and since this is an International conference Crown will share a multinational example of risk assessment.

9:00 AM – 9:30 AM
Robotic System Integrators: What You Need to Know About Robotics & Safety
Craig Salvalaggio, AMT & Mike Marseglia, Calvary Robotics
Craig Salvalaggio

Craig Salvalaggio & Mike Marseglia

AMT/Calvary Robotics

9:30 AM – 10:00 AM
Morning Break
10:00 AM – 10:30 AM
Introduction to Industrial Robot Safety: ISO 10218 Parts 1 and 2
Roberta Nelson Shea, Universal Robots
Roberta Nelson Shea

Roberta Nelson Shea

Universal Robots

Introduction to Industrial Robot Safety: ISO 10218 Parts 1 and 2

This session will present the safety standard ISO 10218-1 and ISO 10218-2, which address robot and robot system safety. The following will be covered: basic terminology, responsibilities for who does what in providing all the pieces towards a safe application, and some of the common misunderstandings when first approaching robot applications.

10:30 AM – 11:00 AM
Introduction to Collaborative Robot System Safety
Jeff Fryman, JDF Consulting Enterprises, Ltd.
Jeff Fryman

Jeff Fryman

JDF Consulting Enterprises, Ltd.

Introduction to Collaborative Robot System Safety

This session will present the safety document ISO/TS 15066 (RIA TR R15.606) describing safety requirements for colllaborative robot systems. We will discuss the four types of collaborative operation and safety considerations for each.

11:00 AM – 11:30 AM
Introduction to R15.08: Industrial Mobile Robot Safety
Michael Gerstenberger, Chairperson for R15.08 Committee
Michael Gerstenberger

Michael Gerstenberger

Chairperson for R15.08 Committee

Introduction to R15.08: Industrial Mobile Robot Safety

The RIA R15.08 drafting subcommittee has been working for approximately 3 years developing a safety standard for industrial mobile robots. This talk covers the following topics: Scope of the standard The four types of industrial mobile robots Structure of the standard Special safety concerns of industrial mobile robots: stability, docking, and more Safety strategies Safety interfaces

11:30 AM – 12:45 PM
Networking Lunch
12:45 PM – 1:30 PM
Case Study: Robot Weld Cell with Manual Load Station
Jim Van Kessel, JVK Industrial Automation 
Thomas Eastwood, Chair, CSA 434, Industrial Robots, and CSA 432, Safeguarding of Machinery
Jim Van KesselThomas Eastwood

Jim Van Kessel

JVK Industrial Automation

 

Thomas Eastwood

Chair, CSA 434, Industrial Robots, and CSA 432, Safeguarding of Machinery

Case Study: Robotic Weld Cell with Manual Load Station

This presentation will be based on a case study. It will demonstrate how to properly install a variety of safety devices to integrate a robot weld cell with manual load station, a Ferris wheel turntable and two robotic welders. It will also look at how product gets handed over to the next stage in the assembly process.

1:30 PM – 2:00 PM
Introduction to Technical Reports and Technical Specifications
Carole Franklin, Robotic Industries Association (RIA)
Carole Franklin

Carole Franklin

Robotic Industries Association (RIA)

Introduction to Technical Reports and Technical Specifications

ISO 10218 (Parts 1 and 2) is the foundational standard for industrial robot system safety. There are a number of helpful supplemental documents that provide greater detail on certain aspects of robot system safety: Technical Specifications (TS - ISO only) and Technical Reports (TR - both ISO and ANSI). This session will introduce the current published TRs and TSs, and will describe several TRs in development.

2:00 PM – 2:30 PM
ISO Technical Report 20218-2 Safety of Manual Loading & Unloading Stations
Otto Görnemann, SICK AG
Otto Görnemann

Otto Görnemann
SICK AG

ISO Technical Report 20218-2 Safety of Manual Loading & Unloading Stations

Robot manual load/unload station shall be designed to eliminate hazards and reduce risks as much as reasonably practicable allowing the operator to interface directly with the industrial robot system, in order to feed/remove material to the robot cell. The design of the robot cell layout shall provide a work area free of hazards and avoid the motivation to circumvent or defeat the designed safeguarding with proper consideration of the ergonomic principles. The presentation explains the Technical Report (TR) ISO 20218-2 and shows practical examples for application.

2:30 PM – 3:00 PM
Afternoon Break
3:00 PM – 3:30 PM
ISO/TR 20218-1:2018 - Safety Design for Industrial Robot Systems - Part 1: End-Effectors
Carolann Quinlan-Smith and Robert Vomiero, Workplace Safety and Prevention Services
Carolann Quinlan-Smith Robert Vomiero

Carolann Quinlan-Smith

Workplace Safety and Prevention Services

Robert Vomiero

Workplace Safety and Prevention Services

An Overview of ISO/TR 20218-1:2018, Robotics - Safety Design for Industrial Robot Systems - Part 1: End-Effectors

Robot end-effectors are an essential component of any robot system. Mounted to the faceplate of industrial robots, end-effectors enable robots to perform a multitude of tasks such as resistance welding, fastening, polishing, material handling, etc. This presentation provides a high-level overview of the some of the key points outlined in the new technical report “ISO/TR 20218-1:2018 Safety Design for Industrial Robot Systems – Part 1: End-Effectors” such as the requirement to conduct a comprehensive risk assessment, and risk reduction measures to be considered for the design and integration of robot end-effectors.

3:30 PM – 4:00 PM
Mitigating Risk by Leveraging the Power of IIoT and Smart Manufacturing
Paul Santi, FANUC

Paul Santi

FANUC

Case Study: Mitigating Risk by Leveraging the Power of IIoT and Smart Manufacturing

It’s called by many names: Industry 4.0, IIoT, Smart Manufacturing, etc. Whatever your preference, the ‘buzz’ this topic generates continues to increase. The ability to harness and analyze device & machine data has earned significant interest. Early adopters are realizing the benefits of monitoring their interconnected operations in real-time enabling faster, more accurate decision-making – often automatically. Initially targeted to be a strategy to improve enterprise-wide manufacturing performance and efficiency, Safety is now being included in the IIoT equation. Analyzing Safety-Related aspects of the operation can help mitigate potentially hazardous situations before they occur.

4:00 PM – 5:00 PM
An OSHA Perspective on Industrial Robot Safety
Keith Erwin, OSHA

Keith Erwin

OSHA

An OSHA Perspective on Industrial Robot Safety

OSHA view on Robotic Safety for inspections, standards and responsibilities.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2018
8:00 AM – 8:30 AM
Standard Update/Safeguarding
Heinz Knackstedt
Heinz Knackstedt

Heinz Knackstedt

C&E sales, inc.

Standard Update/Safeguarding

An overview of the revised B11.19 for 2019. A Risk Assessment and Machine Specific standards determine which risk reduction measures are appropriate or required to reduce risk to an acceptable level. B11.19 establishes the requirements for the design, construction, installation, operation, and maintenance of these risk reduction measures. It does not provide requirements for the selection, but only the implementation of risk reduction measures once chosen. The new revision, due for release in 2019, harmonizes terms with ISO/IEC and introduces and incorporates new or revised requirements for multiple risk reduction measures, including, Field Switching, Trap Key, Full Body Access, Reset/Restart, and additional data on reach distances.

8:30 AM – 9:00 AM
Case Study: Multi-Gantry Robot and AGV Pipe Processing and Material Transfer System
Marvin Winrich, Rockwell Automation
Marvin Winrich

Marvin Winrich

Rockwell Automation

Actual case study: Observations and Recommendations - 3 gantry robots with 1 AGV - steel pipe processing and material transfer system. Robot system is being installed (not in service) to transfer, clean and paint used steel pipes from offshore oil/gas platforms. User’s corporate policy requires a risk assessment to applicable safety Standards. Verify robot, electrical and machine safety compliance with: ANSI / RIA R15.06-2012, Industrial Robots and Robot Systems - Safety Requirements - Parts 1 and 2; ANSI / UL 1740 (January 28, 2018), Standard for Safety - Robots and Robotic Equipment; NFPA 79-2018, Electrical Standard for Industrial Machinery; and OSHA - Machine and Electrical Safety.

9:00 AM – 9:30 AM
Overview of the Upcoming RIA Technical Report T15.906 - Safety-Related Software Systems
Tina Hull, OMRON
Tina Hull

Tina Hull

OMRON

Overview of the Upcoming RIA Technical Report T15.906 - Safety-Related Software Systems

The upcoming RIA.TR906 technical reference gives specific guidance for how to properly design and use safety-related software systems as part of the robot controller, a separate external system, or a combination of multiple methodologies. It list topics to use when creating a test plan, including what should be included in unit, integration and system tests. Design methods are explored with details for topics such as communication and variable use. Programming can affect safety function such as safe distance calculation, so sequence, function block and logic sections will provide guidance so you can create an efficient and effective safety system. Of course, a system must be designed and programmed to meet the required function prescribed in the risk assessment. The verification and validation sections include practical ways to use fault insertion methods to make sure the system operates as intended.

9:30 AM – 10:00 AM
Morning Break
10:00 AM – 10:30 AM
Mobile Robot Systems Implementations in a Collaborative Environment
Denise Ebenhoech, KUKA
Denise Ebenhoech

Denise Ebenhoech

KUKA

Mobile Robot Systems Implementations in a Collaborative Environment

Today’s manufacturers face growing demand for more personalized and varied products to bring to the marketplace, forcing them to look for faster, more creative ways to meet consumer expectations. To better fulfill these requirements, nearly all of them are looking for new and more flexible ways to automate their productions processes. Many are turning to collaborative and mobile robotics systems in an effort to meet their needs. But with these highly flexible solutions comes a whole new set of safety questions as they become exposed to humans in the workplace, especially in an age when both collaborative and traditional robots are being combined with mobile platforms to perform various tasks. This lecture will describe the various safety considerations that manufacturers must take into account before the adoption and implementation of collaborative and mobile robotic systems into their work environments. From the processes that revolve around the job, to the platforms and robots (including tools and parts, the lecturer will walk the attendees through each step of an implementation, sharing experience of the applications that they have worked on. The lecturer will also share examples of the features on collaborative robots and mobile robot systems, as well as some or the strategies being employed to protect workers when traditional robots are coupled with mobile platforms.

10:30 AM – 11:00 AM
Case Study: Using Multiple Modes of Safety to Create a Safe Application
Mark Lewandowski, Procter & Gamble

Mark Lewandowski

Procter & Gamble

Case Study: Using Multiple Modes of Safety to Create a Safe Application

Power and force limited (PFL) collaborative robots are not usually enough to create a safe robot application. Multiple modes of safeguarding are usually required in order to provide acceptable levels of hazard reduction for collaborative robot applications. This presentation will discuss how and when to use different types of safety strategies to implement a safe robotics application.

11:00 AM – 11:30 AM
Panel: Taking Collaborative Approach to Securing Robotics
Nathaniel Cole, TUV Rheinland OpenSky
Roberta Nelson Shea, Universal Robots

Nathaniel Cole

TUV Rheinland OpenSky

Roberta Nelson Shea

Roberta Nelson Shea

Universal Robots

Panel: Taking Collaborative Approach to Securing Robotics

With the continued digitization of our work processes, systems and equipment to meet the evolving needs, taking a collaborative approach to securing devices and ensuring safety has become crucial. Within a complex robotic ecosystem, there are multiple parties that have ownership of ensuring security and safety of these devices, applications and systems. Understanding the roles these parties play is critical to address the continued digitization and increasing exposure. In this topic, we will discuss why a collaborative approach and understanding role responsibility is needed to design, build and deploy secure robot systems. During this topic key questions will be presented that should be considered by all roles involved to understand how to manage potential risks throughout design and deployment process.

11:30 AM – 12:00 PM
LockOut TagOut Versus Machine Guarding on Robot Cells
Michael DeRosier, Schmersal

Michael DeRosier

Schmersal

LockOut TagOut Versus Machine Guarding on Robot Cells

This will be a 30 minute session, where we will discuss examples of tasks associated with robots and robot integrated cells and relating them to acceptable safety practices per OSHA requirements. When is it required to implement LOTO and when can people utilize guarding to provide the required safety needed for the robot. Discussion will define OSHA 29CFR1910.147 and 29CFR1910.212 and what a company needs to do in order to define and document tasks related to each of these standards for the control of hazardous energy and machine guarding respectively.

12:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Networking Lunch/Exhibitor Expo
2:00 PM – 2:30 PM
Safeguarding Robot Systems
Zachary Stank, Phoenix Contact

Zachary Stank

Phoneix Contact

Safeguarding Robot Systems

In this presentation, we will review aspects of RIA TR R15.406-2014, highlighting guarding concepts using interlocking devices and diving deeper into the international EN ISO 14119 standard. Highlights of the lecture will be defining and reviewing the types of interlocking safety devices and exploring why multiple periodic movable guards in series could lead to fault masking.

2:30 PM – 3:00 PM
Guidelines for Safe Robot System Assembly
Dan Junker, Automation Rangers
Dan Junker

Dan Junker

Automation Rangers

Guidelines for Safe Robot System Assembly

Problem: Assembly and Testing life cycle phases of a Robot System are often not safe. Solution: Address this problem with guidelines from RIA R15.06-2012, and supporting TRs 306, 406 and 506. Also, we recommend using NFPA 79, NFPA 70E and EN 13849-1 and/or ANSI B11.19. Robot systems, during the life cycle segment of assembly and testing, require Safeguards and Complementary Protective Measures like any other life cycle segment.

3:00 PM – 3:30 PM
Design of a Multifunction Robot Cell
Tom Vardon, Faraday Future

Tom Vardon

Faraday Future

Design of a Multifunction Robot Cell

This presentation will discuss the requirements for robot safety in a multifunction robot cell. In cases where production requirements are low and budgetary constraints prevent purchasing multiple robots, integrators are tasked with building robot cells that perform multiple functions. This presentation will discuss the design approach and touch on the following subjects: risk assessment, operating space, robot reach and load requirements, calculation of safety rated soft axis and space limiting stop distances, and restricted space. Finally it will show how to use this data to determine the safeguarded space and the space required for the robot cell.

3:30 PM – 4:00 PM
Afternoon Break
4:00 PM – 4:30 PM
Safety Considerations for End-Effectors
Stefan Casey, Applied Robotics

Stefan Casey

Applied Robotics

Safety Considerations for End-Effectors

Industrial robots can be used for an infinite number of applications, but they are not very useful without some sort of end-of-arm tooling (EOAT). Whether it be moving an object or manipulating a material, such as welding or polishing, the robot needs something on the end to do the job. Because every application is unique, the safety considerations are also unique every time. Temporarily holding an item to quickly pick and place it is a hazardous situation in the making. And beyond that, most incidents occur during non-standard operation, such as set-up, programming, debug, maintenance, loss of power/air, and so on. A number of accidents can occur and potentially injure a person in the process. Built into industrial robots are safety mechanisms, but these mechanisms do not typically extend to the EOAT. We will discuss potential accidents and different methods to prevent or protect people from them, as it relates to EOAT.

4:30 PM – 5:00 PM
Robot Restricted Space - Implementation in GM
Chris Ihrke, General Motors

Chris Ihrke

General Motors

Robot Restricted Space - Implementation in GM

Presentation description coming soon.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2018
Three different tracks are avalable:
  • Track 1: Risk Assessment
  • Track 2: Collaborative Robots
  • Track 3: Effective Partnerships
8:00 AM – 9:30 AM
Track 1: Key to Determining Accurate Safety System Performance Requirements of Robot Systems
Chris Soranno, SICK Product & Competence Center Americas, LLC

Chris Soranno

SICK Product & Competence Center Americas, LLC

Key to Determining Accurate Safety System Performance Requirements of Robot Systems: Conduct a Comprehensive Risk Assessment

Many robot system integrators (and users) feel constrained by the requirements of the current robot safety standard regarding performance requirements for safety-related parts of the control system (SRP/CS). However, this perception results in unnecessary – and sometimes over burdensome – limitations, complexity, and expense to the design of safety-related control systems. By now, many designers are aware that both the Robot (in Part 1) and the Robot System (in Part 2) must meet the safety-related control systems requirements of either: • Performance Level (PL) = d with structure category 3 according to ISO 13849-1, or • Safety Integrity Level (SIL) 2 with hardware fault tolerance of 1 with proof test interval of not less than 20 years according to IEC 62061. Surprising to many in the industry, these requirements are in fact not ‘mandatory.’ In reality, the standard allows for either the Robot or the Robot System (or both) to be designed to other safety-related control system performance, as warranted by the application, and determined by (what the standard calls) a “comprehensive risk assessment.” Risk assessment is now mandatory for both robot suppliers and robot system integrators to determine the risk reduction measures required to adequately reduce the risks of each application. Therefore, a thorough review of the standard reveals that safety engineers have two options: 1) apply generic requirements intended as a ‘catch all’ for the all robots deployed in industry, OR 2) leverage the compulsory risk assessment process (already being performed) to also define the performance requirements commensurate to the specific risks for each unique application. This presentation will not dissect the meaning and interpretation of Performance Levels or Safety Integrity Levels. Instead, this lecture is intended to provide a practical and “comprehensive” approach to the mandatory risk assessment process to determine the appropriate control system performance criteria for the selected risk reduction measures in order to achieve acceptable residual risk.

8:00 AM – 8:45 AM
Track 2: Case Study: Collaborative Robotics in Today’s Industries
Nathan Scott, BSI EHS Services and Solutions
Mollie Anderson, BSI EHS Services and Solutions

Nathan Scott

BSI EHS Services & Solutions

Mollie Anderson

BSI EHS Services & Solutions

Track 2: Case Study: Collaborative Robotics in Today’s Industries: Qualitative Risk Assessment and Case Studies from High Tech, R&D Labs, and Biopharma

Collaborative robots continue to be solutions to keep pace with rapid change, maximizing safety and efficiency. New applications, work environments and safety standards are challenging. Included are methods and findings of actual, confidential risk assessments for global, process-intensive manufacturing companies, R&D labs.

8:45 AM – 9:30 AM
Track 2: 3D Sensors: New Approaches and Applications to Robotic Safety 
Scott Denenberg, Veo Robotics

Scott Denenberg

Veo Robotics

Track 2: 3D Sensors: New Approaches and Applications to Robotic Safety

There is an emerging class of manufacturing tasks that are best achieved by a human and robots working collaboratively together. However, because of the safety requirements for robots and humans working near each other, existing collaborative robots are speed and force-limited, greatly reducing the possible range of applications. Current guarding technology such as cages or even more sophisticated 2D sensors such as 2D LIDAR are insufficiently flexible to allow for this type of collaboration using traditional industrial robots. As a result, these kinds of manufacturing steps are typically implemented either by automating the aspect of the task that is best done by a human, often at great expense and complication, or using a human worker to do the part of the task that is best done by a robot (perhaps using additional equipment such as lift assist devices) which may be slow, error-prone, and inefficient, and may lead to repetitive stress injuries or exposure to hazardous situations for human workers. Newly available sensors providing 3D depth information show great promise in allowing human-robot collaboration using traditional industrial robots. Examples of such sensors include 3D time-of-flight cameras, 3D LIDAR, and stereo vision cameras. These sensors can detect and locate intrusions into the area surrounding industrial machinery in 3D, which could allow tighter and cost-effective human-robot collaboration modes. New types of guarding and safety systems based on 3D sensing could enable industrial engineers to design processes where each subset of the task is appropriately assigned to a human or a machine for an optimal solution that maximizes workcell efficiency and lowers costs, while keeping human workers safe. In this lecture we will review 3D sensing and applications to robotic safety, including challenges to implementation, and present Veo’s approach using 3D time-of-flight cameras for robotic workcell safety.

8:00 AM – 9:30 AM
Track 3: Robot Safety - It's a Collaborative Effort!
Carla Silver, Carla Silver LLC

Carla Silver

Carla Silver, LLC

Track 3: Robot Safety- It's a Collaborative Effort!

Robot Safety – It’s a Collaborative Effort! This presentation will explore the traditional culture and roles of the manufacturer/integrator, project engineer, safety professional and end user in ensuring safety within a robotic system. A safety management paradigm shift has to occur to ensure all parties collaboratively work together to build in and own safety. How does this happen? What does it take? What are the obstacles? Where do we go from here to develop this positive safety management system? The presentation will present a forward thinking view of what it takes to work as a team by developing an effective safety management system for equipment / robot safety.

9:30 AM – 10:00 AM
Morning Break
10:00 AM – 11:30 AM
Track 1: How to Conduct Qualitative and Quantitative Hazard Analysis and Risk Assessment to EIC 61508
Jonathan Moore, Exida

Jonathan Moore

Exida

Track 1: How to Conduct Qualitative and Quantitative Hazard Analysis and Risk Assessment to EIC 61508

How to conduct qualitative and quantitative hazard analysis and risk assessment (HARA) to IEC 61508 Effective risk reduction is required in all safety standards. This workshop will tailor an example HARA analysis to the needs of robots designed to operate among people and provide guidance on the thinking and techniques used to identify the appropriate risk reduction required.

10:00 AM – 10:45 AM
Track 2: Case Study: Implementing a Collaborative Robotic Application and Qualify to the TS15066
Brian Bales, KUKA Assembly and Test

Brian Bales

KUKA Assembly and Test

Track 2: Case Study: CImplementing a Collaborative Robotic Application and Qualify to the TS15066

Brian will discuss a case study challenges of implementing a major OEM's 1st collaborative robotic application installed in North. Brian will discuss the different types of collaborative applications, the challenges he perceives in future applications, and the methods that were used to qualify to the TS15066.

10:45 AM – 11:30 AM
Track 2: Case Study: Collision Control in Programming Collaborative Robots for Quality Control
Mingu Kang, ARIS Technology

Mingu Kang

ARIS Technology

Track 3: Case Study: Collision Control in Programming Collaborative Robots for Quality Control

There are benefits of using collaborative robots over traditional industrial robots in automating 3D measurements and using the measurements data for Quality Control (QC) inspection. The primary benefit comes from an improved user experience (UX) in setting up robot locations and orientation of optical devices against the part being measured. Users can define and save a robot program by manipulating robot arms with hands without a teach pendant. However, such benefit results in some difficulties in collision control. This presentation will discuss the benefits and limitations of using collaborative robots in 3D metrology applications.

10:00 AM – 11:30 AM
Track 3: How Can End-Users Make the Most of Their Partnership with Integrators?
Michael DeRosier, Schmersal

Michael DeRosier

Schmersal

Track 3: How Can End-Users Make the Most of Their Partnership with Integrators?

During this 90 minute discussion, the focus will be on how to have the end-users working closely with their integrators to ensure robot systems are being installed properly and function safely. A review will be giving on information that should be part of the bid proposal from the very start of the project. In addition, ensuring that clear specifications as well as understanding is being provided. Having those clear specifications and also providing staged design reviews is important to ensure effective communication and mutual understanding of expectations.

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM
Networking Lunch
1:00 PM – 2:30 AM
Track 1: Exploring Risk Assessment Tools for Safety in Robotics
Fran Sehn, Willis Towers Watson

Fran Sehn

Willis Towers Watson

Track 1: Exploring Risk Assessment Tools for Safety in Robotics

The session will focus on assessments\ methodologies that can be used by that can be deployed by the robotics industry and users of robotics to identify, assess and minimize or control risks associated with operations. It will include interactive examples with each assessment method to enhance the learning experience.

1:00 PM – 2:30 PM
Track 2: Collaborative Robot Risk Assessment and Collision Measurement
Elena Dominguez, Pilz Automation Safety

Elena Dominguez

Pilz Automation Safety

Track 2: Collaborative Robot Risk Assessment and Collision Measurement

Collaborative robot risk assessment and collision measurement
To safely operate a collaborative robot system in power and force limited mode, it is essential to conduct a thorough risk assessment to identify key risk factors including the following. "Potential operator/robot collision points, contact surfaces, associated tasks and frequency, type of collision, quasi-static vs. transient, and exposed body parts." The next step is to evaluate the system and validate the safety functions. This involves force levels, contact pressure and speed. This presentation shall step through the process and provide some exercises to highlight concepts and actual measurements using a robot and collision measurement tool.
Identifying collision measurement points
One important output of a collaborative robot system risk assessment is the selection of the measurement points. Where should be anticipate these operator / robot collisions occur? What body regions should we consider as being exposed? What type of collision will it be? Is it quasi-static or transient? Several collaborative robot systems will be presented and the reasoning used to identify the measurement points. How was the measurement device positioned? What are some of the typical resulting measurements?

1:00 PM – 2:30 PM
Track 3: Panel: The OSHA/NIOSH/RIA Alliance: Working Collaboratively to Improve Workplace Safety and Health
Christina Jones, OSHA, Dawn Castillo, NIOSH and Carole Franklin, RIA
Carole Franklin

Christina Jones

OSHA
 

Dawn Castillo

NIOSH
 

Carole Franklin

RIA

Track 3: Panel: The OSHA/NIOSH/RIA Alliance: Working to Collaboratively Improve Workplace Safety and Health

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and the Robotic Industries Association (RIA) began working together in May of 2017 to create a collaborative framework to improve awareness of and research dedicated to reducing workplace hazards associated with traditional industrial robots and the emerging technology of human robot collaboration (HRC) installations and systems. The three organizations signed an Alliance in October 2017 to foster a technical exchange and information sharing among RIA members, OSHA, NIOSH, employers, and workers concerning mechanical (machine guarding, lockout/tagout), electrical, and other hazards, and how best to controls exposures during operations involving human interaction with the robotic systems found in workplaces now and in the future. This workshop will provide attendees information about the Alliance; the roles, capabilities, and activities of each organization; and the work to date on key collaborative projects, including technical training for safety and health professionals and researchers, and a technical resource to replace the current OSHA Technical Manual chapter Industrial Robots and Robot System Safety. It will also offer attendees an opportunity for an open dialogue with the organizations on areas of interest related to workplace safety and health that may be addressed through this collaborative mechanism.

2:30 AM – 3:00 PM
Afternoon Break
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Closing Keynote: Managing AI and Smart Robotics Risks in Industry 4.0 Today and into the Future
Martin Ciupa, MindMaze

Martin Ciupa

MindMaze

Managing AI and Smart Robotics Risks in Industry 4.0 Today and into the Future

This presentation undertakes a systematic evaluation of those risks in a pragmatic, "down to earth", form of generic questions needed to be addressed by Industrial Automation designers and engineers implementing Industry 4.0 and AI in their manufacturing scenarios. It looks at several case examples in actual industrial settings and applies the Conceptual Risk Analysis Methodology (CRAMSM) in outline. E.g.,

  • The case of design and integration testing in simulation prior to physical implementation is discussed (with Digital Twin after-delivery support), and
  • The use of Deep Learning Black-Boxes (say in Healthcare Robotics - an environment that requires compliance with legal rules and industry best practices) is reviewed and the question asked can we trust them? What can we do to manage that specific risk/issue? >/li>
The talk is intended to prepare the attendees with the right questions to ask to provide confident solutions to real-world Industrial Automation risk problems today, but also show the approach needed to intercept and handle some of the issues of Industry 5.0 risks coming soon to factories near you.
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Registration

Join us at this important robot safety event as we discuss in-depth the latest industry standards, including ISO 10218-1, 2:2011. You'll want to hear the industry experts discuss how to identify tasks and hazards, and how to install safeguards. You'll also want to gain insight from users who'll share real-life experiences.  

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Discounts are available to RIA members. Become an RIA member today and take advantage of the benefits right away!

Group Registration is available!
Send 5+ people from the same company and receive $100 off each registration! Click the “Register Now” button for more details.

International Robot Safety Conference
Dates Pass Members Non-Members
September 11 - Event Full Access
Tuesday/Wednesday
Wednesday/Thursday
Exhibits Only Pass (Valid only Oct. 10)
$1,245
$1,045
$1,045
$50
$1,345
$1,145
$1,145
$50

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Event Sponsors

ATI Industrial Automation Dynatect Manufacturing, Inc. FANUC GM logo Güdel Honeywell Intelligrated KEBA Corporation McNaughton-McKay Rockwell Automation

Hotel Information

The International Robot Safety Conference will be held at the Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center.

Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center
400 Renaissance Drive
Detroit, MI, 48243
(877) 901-6632

Please click the link to make your reservation. Or guests can call the Hotel at (877) 901-6632 and reference the "RIA International Robot Safety Conference."

Room rate cut-off: Monday, September 17, 2018 (@ 5:00 PM)
Room Block Rate: $179.00

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Who's Speaking

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SPEAKERS
Brian Bales Brian Bales
Robotics Technical Specialist Leader – PPG R&D
KUKA Assembly and Test Corp.
Carla Silver Carla Silver
Safety Consultant
Carla Silver, LLC
Carolann Quinlan-Smith Carolann Quinlan-Smith
Health and Safety Consultant
Workplace Safety and Prevention Services
Carole Franklin Carole Franklin
Director of Standards Development
RIA
César Reyes Núñez César Reyes Núñez
EHS Coordinator, Crown Mexico
Crown Mexico
Chris Ihrke Chris Ihrke
Staff Engineer
General Motors
Chris Soranno Chris Soranno
Safety Standards & Competence Manager
SICK Product & Competence Center Americas, LLC
Christina Jones Christina Jones
Director, Office of Outreach Services and Alliances
Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)
Craig Salvalaggio Craig Salvalaggio
Vice President
Applied Manufacturing Technologies
Dan Junker Dan Junker
President and Chief Ranger
Automation Rangers
Dawn Castillo Dawn Castillo
Director, Division of Safety Research
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
Denise Ebenhoech Denise Ebenhoech
Regional Head of Advanced Robotic Applications
KUKA Robotics
Elena Dominguez
Safety Consultant
Pilz Automation Safety
Fran Sehn Fran Sehn
Safety and Risk Control Consulting
Willis of PA
Heinz E. Knackstedt Heinz E. Knackstedt
Safety Specialist
C&E sales, inc.
Jeff Fryman Jeff Fryman
Principal Consultant
JDF Consulting Enterprises, Ltd.
Jeff Pratt Jeff Pratt
Senior Corporate Environmental Health & Safety Engineer
Crown Equipment Corporation
Jim Van Kessel Jim Van Kessel
Owner
JVK Industrial Automation Inc.
Jonathan Moore Jonathan Moore
Director Advanced Systems
exida LLC
Keith Erwin
Safety Instructor
Dept of Labor - OSHA
Mark Lewandowski Mark Lewandowski
Robotics Technical Network Global Innovation Leader
Procter & Gamble
Martin Ciupa
Head of AI Initiatives / CAIO
MindMaze
Marvin Winrich Marvin Winrich
Safety Consultant
Rockwell Automation
Michael DeRosier Michael DeRosier
Engineering Services Manager
Schmersal
Michael Gerstenberger Michael Gerstenberger
Staff Roboticist
Chairperson for R15.08 Committee
Mingu Kang Mingu Kang
CEO
ARIS Technology
Mollie Anderson Mollie Anderson
Principal Consultant, Manager
BSI Services & Solutions
Nathan Scott Nathan Scott
Associate Consultant
BSI EHS Services and Solutions
Nathaniel Cole Nathaniel Cole
Chief Technology Officer: Cybersecurity Testing & Certification
TUV Rheinland OpenSky
Otto Görnemann Otto Görnemann
Expert Machinery Safety Standards & regulations. Chairman of ISO/TC199 & CEN/TC114
SICK AG
Paul Santi Paul Santi
General Manager - Powertrain Systems Group
FANUC America Corporation
Robert Vomeiro Robert Vomeiro
Machine & Robotics Safety Specialist, Technical Services
Workplace Safety and Prevention Services
Roberta Nelson Shea Roberta Nelson Shea
Global Technical Compliance Officer
Universal Robots
Scott Denenberg Scott Denenberg
Chief Architect, Senior Director of Hardware
Veo Robotics
Stefan Casey Stefan Casey
VP, Director of Engineering
Applied Robotics, Inc.
Thomas Eastwood Thomas Eastwood
Chair
CSA 434, Industrial Robots, and CSA 432, Safeguarding of Machinery
Tina Hull Tina Hull
Product Engineer
Omron
Tom Vardon Tom Vardon
Senior Equipment and Automation Safety Technician
Faraday Future
Zachary Stank Zachary Stank
Associate Product Marketing Manager
Phoenix Contact